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10 Most Common Home Decorating Don’ts

Learn what not to do with your decor (and how to fix it if you already have).

Sure, your rooms look OK at first glance: You finally got rid of that lumpy sofa and own a set of kitchen chairs that don’t fold up. But what would an interior decorator have to say about the state of your home? If you suspect your attempts at “mix and match” just look messy or your furniture arrangements are a little too fussy, read on to see if you’re committing our experts’ top decorating faux pas—and learn what you can do to fix them.

Faux Pas #1: Ignoring Scale

Every piece of furniture looks great in the store—but chances are your rooms aren’t showroom size. “Measure your space and decorate accordingly,” suggests Kenneth Brown, a Los Angeles–based interior designer who sells home decor pieces through QVC. For smaller rooms, ignore your instinct to use a series of diminutive pieces; fewer large-scale pieces will make it seem less busy. On a similar note, consider filling a wall with a single large painting, rather than a group of smaller frames. “It will act as an additional window and draw the eye beyond the room,” says Brown.

Faux Pas #2: Relying on Recessed Lighting

“I’m so tired of recessed lighting,” says Brown. “It makes a room look like a football field.” If you have recessed lights, use them, but layer your lighting by incorporating additional lighting features. Consider table lamps and floor lamps, and highlight artwork with picture lights. “Your room—and everyone in it—will look beautiful,” says Brown.

Faux Pas #3: Buying the Entire Matching Set

Just because a store showcases a sofa, loveseat, chair, table and ottoman as a set doesn’t mean you have to buy every piece. The first piece Brown recommends leaving behind? The loveseat. In its place choose two chairs, which will allow you to mix and match colors and patterns. Another way to mix things up: Choose a traditional sofa in an unexpected, modern color.

Faux Pas #4: Picking Paint Colors in the Store

“Stores have terrible lighting,” warns Brown. If you choose a color based on what you see in the store, chances are you’ll hate what winds up on your walls. Before you have an employee mix a few gallons of paint, first consider the colors in natural light, and then again in your home. For the best perspective, Brown suggests poking a hole in a piece of white paper, holding the paint swatch behind it, then looking at the color through the hole. This will give you an unadulterated view of the color.

Faux Pas #5: Letting an Accent Overtake a Room

Too much of one thing, like an animal print, can look overdone. “You don’t want to live in a theme park,” says Brown. It’s fine to introduce an accent piece—a few pillows, a throw or this animal print bench. Just remember that a little bit of pizzazz goes a long way.

Faux Pas #6: Having Knickknacks Scattered Around

“Nothing’s worse than a bunch of tchotchkes placed randomly around a room,” says Susie Coelho, HGTV host, author and designer for Grandin Road. The most frequent offenders: angel statues, children’s pottery and mismatched candlesticks. Edit your collection as much as possible—consider showcasing just a few pieces and rotating the display seasonally—then put everything in a curio cabinet or on a corner table. By grouping like items, you make insubstantial pieces more significant.

Faux Pas #7: Displaying Greenery in Itty-Bitty Pots

“Plants should make a statement,” says Coelho. “Otherwise they should be left outdoors!” Yes, small planters were en vogue in the ’70s, but that decade has passed. The modern way to do it is to use one large tree in a pot. A series of small indoor plants is just going to make your space seem cluttered—and dated.

Faux Pas #8: Getting Overzealous with Wall Color

Walls covered in too many colors are distracting and create visual tension. “You want your guests to feel stimulated, but you also want them to feel relaxed, says Coelho. A yellow room followed by a turquoise room followed by an orange room looks tacky and badly planned. To ensure a soothing flow from room to room, focus on a subtle variety of colors or tones, such as coordinating shades of green or earth tones.

Faux Pas #9: Not Knowing When to Quit

People are inclined to add more furniture and more artwork and more stuff until they can’t move around in a room without knocking over a decorative table. “You may have some stunning pieces,” says Coelho. “But who can tell when they’re surrounded by average ones?” The current trend is toward simplicity. To make a statement, clear out clutter and let your rooms breathe.

Faux Pas #10: Selecting Busy Textiles

When you’re choosing window coverings, tablecloths and upholstery fabrics, steer clear of anything with heavy gathering, ruffles or too much fringe. “Cleaner lines are better,” says Coelho, “and they’ll collect less dust.” If you favor prints, keep them subtle so you can switch things up periodically. If you opt for a loud print, you’re forced to use that piece as the room’s focus until you get rid of it.

10 Tips for a Beautiful Yard

Need to add variety to your garden or add color year-round? We’ve got you covered. Try some or all of these ideas to spruce up your yard.

Photo: Ralph Anderson

1. Greet Guests with Flowers

Flowers always make a home seem more welcoming. Adorn your entrance with assorted annuals and perrenials to keep color year long. Petunia, Snapdragon, Lily-of-the-Nile, and ‘Gertrude Jekyl’ roses are great additions.

If you have a small space beetween your house and the street, try putting a low fence in front. It gives the illusion that your house is farther from the street than it really is, and it also makes for a great space for planting flowers and vines.

Photo: Ralph Anderson

2. Plant Rambling Vines

Clematis is one of the showiest vines we have. It offers blossoms of blue, purple, red, pink, or white. Grow them on a fence, on a trellis, or in a container. Or let them scramble over shrubs and perennials.

Clematis Planting Guide
When to Plant: Fall and spring are good times, because the weather is cool.
How to Grow: Plant clematis in fertile, loose, well-drained soil with lots of organic matter. It likes cool roots, so plant where the leaves get sun but roots are shaded.
How to Fertilize: Feed monthly in spring and summer with an organic fertilizer labeled for roses or tomatoes.
When to Prune: Some types bloom on new growth and some on old growth. When you buy, ask at the nursery what type you have and when you should prune.
Where to Buy: Local garden centers have lots of choices in spring.

Photo: Ralph Anderson

3. Dress Up Your Driveway

By carefully sculpting the landscape and choosing the right plants and materials, you can hide your unattractive driveway. Start by creating a slightly raised island of lawn in the center of the drive. Then, add a low boxwood hedge toward the back of the island with roses, annuals, and perennials rising above the hedge in the front. Blend a variety of colors, textures, and heights for a great look. Try ‘Crystal Fairy’ rose for height, lamb’s ears for texture, and ‘Butterfly Deep Rose’ pentas for color.

Photo: Van Chaplin

4. Plant No-Fuss Lilies

Crinums laugh at drought, don’t need fertilizer, and welcome hot, humid summers with lily-like flowers that perfume the air. Growing into huge bulbs over time, they’re practically indestructible.

Crinum Planting Guide
Why You’ll Love Them: Fragrant, trumpet-shaped flowers in many colors appear in spring, summer, or fall.
How to Grow: Most prefer at least five hours of sun a day. They’re not picky about soil.
Where to Grow: Most do best in the Lower, Coastal, and Tropical South (zones 8-10). Some, such as Crinum x powellii ‘Alba’ and ‘Ellen Bosanquet,’ are hardy farther north.

Photo: Ralph Anderson

5. Deer-Proof Your Garden

To keep your flowers from being gobbled up by deer, choose flowers that people find glorious and deer find disgusting. Choose perennials like butterfly weed, globe thistle, ‘royal red’ butterfly bush, or purple cornflower. Find these at garden centers, and plant them in well-drained soil.

Photo: Van Chaplin

6. Add Height with Planters and Baskets

Add dimension to your yard with elevated planters and hanging baskets. It creates a sea of beautiful color. Plants love the good drainage and aeration that raised planters provide.

Basket Planting Guide
Each basket should contain three types of plants-a “spiller” (something that hangs down over the edges) like begonias and variegated sage, a “filler” (something that mounds and fills in) like Kong coleus, and a “thriller” (something that is tall and eye-catching for the center) like purple cordyline.

Photo: Van Chaplin

7. Grow Blooming Shrubs

Chinese snowball is one of spring’s showiest shrubs. White flower clusters 6 to 8 inches across festoon its branches in late spring. The plant gets big—12 to 20 feet tall and wide. Though it looks like a hydrangea, it’s actually a viburnum.

Chinese Snowball Planting Guide
Where to Plant: Find a prominent spot where it will have room to grow.
How to Grow: Give it full to partial sun and fertile, well-drained soil. Prune, if necessary, just after it finishes flowering in spring.
Where to Buy: It’s available at home-and-garden centers.

Photo: Van Chaplin

8. Hide Outdoor Structures

Sheds, garages, and outdoor workspaces are not always the most attractive in your yard. Use these spaces as a setting for a beautiful display of plants and flowers. Try adding brackets and a wooden plank to create a shelf on the exterior of the structure above the entrance or windows. Then, set lightweight fiberglass planters filled with flowers atop it to hide the structure. Potted ferns are great additions for the base of the structure.

Photo: Ralph Anderson

9. Plan a Garden Surprise

Create a garden paradise in your yard with intersecting trails, meandering streams, inspiring vistas, and hidden rooms. Design small hideaways where people can gather for drinks and try mixing formal with informal for stimulating visual tension. You can also get creative and save the biggest garden surprise for the farthest spot in your yard instead of putting it directly next to the house.

Photo: Ralph Anderson

10. Enjoy Color Year-Round

A great thing about gardening in the South is that we get treated to colorful flowers, leaves, or berries in every season. Look for these each season:

Seasonal Flower Guide
Spring: azalea, daffodil, forsythia mandevilla, dogwood, wisteria, bearded iris (pictured), peony
Summer: hydrangea, daylily, gardenia, crinum, lantana, crepe myrtle, impatiens, zinnia
Fall: pansy, aster, sugar maple, beautyberry, ginger lily sasanqua camellia, holly, autumn crocus, mum
Winter: winterberry, Colorado blue spruce, amaryllis, Lenten rose, rosemary, saucer magnolia, flowering quince, crocus

 

Publish Site: www.southernliving.com/home-garden/gardens/10-best-yard-landscaping-ideas-00417000072301/

 

10 Ways to Develop Your Personal Style

Believe it or not, but you can look fashionably fabulous without breaking the bank. Scott Quinn Photography/Getty Images

When celebrities like Kate Moss and Victoria Beckham run out for a few things at the grocery store, they look like they’ve just stepped out of the pages of Vogue magazine. It’s easy to look fabulous all the time when you have personal stylists at your beck and call — not to mention a virtually unlimited budget at your disposal.

For those of us with limited bank accounts, however, looking fashionable can be more of a challenge. Yet fashion experts say that you can look fabulous, regardless of you much you spend. Part of the key to becoming a fashionista is figuring out your personal style — then finding specific wardrobe pieces that highlight it.

So, here are 10 ways to cultivate your own special look. You’ll find out how to buy clothes that accentuate your assets, learn tips for making the most of your existing wardrobe and discover how to look like a million bucks — without spending anywhere near that much.

10: Know Who You Are

Before you can figure out your personal style, you have to figure out who you are as a person. Hisham Ibrahim/Getty Images

How do you like to dress? Are you wild or more conservative? Do you prefer business formal or casual comfort? Is your current wardrobe classically elegant or fashion forward? Consider the persona you want to present to the world.

Think about:

  • Your age. Clothing should always be age-appropriate. If you’ve got grandchildren and you’re dressing like them, there’s a problem. It’s OK to want to look youthful — just make sure your outfits suit your stage of life.
  • Your occupation. You wouldn’t wear jeans and a cut-off T-shirt to work at a law firm, and you wouldn’t wear super-high heels and a short skirt to teach kindergarteners. Use your profession as your guide when you shop. Once you’ve got an appropriate ensemble for your job, jazz it up with a few accessories to add your own personal flair.
  • Your lifestyle. Stiletto heels are just fine for the city, but they’ll make you stick out like a sore thumb if you live way out in the country. Fashion should combine form and function, and it should fit well with your surroundings.

Remember that you don’t need to buy designer duds to express your personal style. Even jeans and T-shirts can be stylish if you feel comfortable in them and choose the right ones.

Fashion inspiration can come from a variety of sources, from magazines to your friends' personal style. M. Nader/Getty Images

9: Look for Inspiration

Find a celebrity or model (or a few) who best captures the style you want to emulate. Flip through the pages of leading fashion and entertainment magazines to find pictures of your style icons. Cut out those pictures and paste them into a binder or hang them up around your room to inspire you. Don’t copycat –just use elements of that celebrity’s look as a springboard to create your own style.

Take your own pictures. Carry along a camera or sketchpad as you window shop.

Inspiration can come from a variety of sources. Don’t just look at what’s hot today. Scour vintage clothing stores and flip through the pages of old magazines and history books so you can see the origins of the latest styles. Look to both modern and classic fashion icons, like Jackie Onassis or Grace Kelly. You might find that your personal style combines elements from both your grandmother’s era and your own.

8: Know What You Want to Accomplish

If you want to upgrade your career, you might want to consider upgrading your wardrobe Hugh Sitton/Getty Images

Do you want to get a new, high-powered job? Are you trying to meet the guy of your dreams?

Take out a notebook or journal and write down your goals — in life and in fashion. Then start to think about which design elements and accessories can help you accomplish those goals. If you want to get a better job, think about adding a few pieces to your suit collection. If you’re headed back to school, you’ll want to trade in a few of the suits you already have for some casual knits and jeans.

Once you have your list in hand, take it with you when you shop. It can also help to bring along some pictures or descriptions of what you already have in your closet. Ask the salesperson to help you pick out pieces that will enhance your current wardrobe and help you accomplish your goals.

Fashion-forward women should pick pieces that highlight their favorite body parts. Dan Hallman/Getty Images

7: Accentuate Your Assets

What are the best parts of your body? Focus on the areas that you like best; choose clothing and accessories to highlight them.

For example, if you have gorgeous blue eyes, show them off with eye shadow and liner colors that really make them pop. Endless legs deserve to be seen in short shorts and mini-skirts.

Know your measurements so you can find clothing that fits well. Write down your measurements and bring them with you when you shop.

Try to dress to your body shape. For example:

  • Most women’s bodies are pear-shaped, which means they have a narrow waist and wider hips. If you’re pear-shaped, buy clothing that draws attention to your slim upper body. Brightly colored shirts, scarves and modern-looking shoulder pads should work well. Wear tailored pants and skirts, as well as hip-length long jackets. Avoid pleats and stripes, which will further accentuate broader areas.
  • If you’re rounder and more apple-shaped all around, you’ll want to draw attention away from your waist. Go for flat-fronted skirts, empire-waisted dresses and tailored, wide-legged pants.
  • Don’t accentuate a flat chest with a deep v-neck. Instead, choose rounded-neck tops, and add a layered necklace to add dimension.
  • If you’re busty, accentuate your curves by wearing a scooped neckline that hugs your chest appropriately.
  • If you’re extra curvy, you don’t have to wear baggy, saggy clothes. You can still find fashionable, tailored clothes that comfortably compliment your body. Shop in stores that can accommodate your shape and buy clothes that fit well.

6: Take a Style Lesson

You don't need a degree in fashion to understand it. You just need a good eye and a willingness to learn. Jamie Grill/Getty Images

Don’t know your Armani from your Kmart casuals? Do you have to twist around and check the label to know what you’re wearing? Time to brush up — fashion illiteracy can stop your personal style quest dead in its tracks.

You don’t need a degree in fashion to understand clothing. You just need to be more aware when you shop. Look at different fabrics. See how polyester feels compared to silk. Learn the difference between plaids and houndstooth prints. Figure out how to see differences in an outfit’s stitching and cut.

Look for a variety of fabrics when you shop. Choose some cotton pieces for everyday, silk ones for dressing up, wool for the winter and linen for spring and summer. Learn how to care for your fabrics too: Cotton/polyester blends are great for everyday because they barely wrinkle, but you’ll need to keep your linens carefully pressed if you don’t want to walk around looking rumpled. Silks are more delicate, so be extra careful about spills.

Know which fabrics and textures are most flattering. Shiny, bulky, or stiff textures can make you appear bigger than you really are. Smooth, matte surfaces, like cashmere and jersey, can really slim you down.

As a student of fashion, your “textbooks” should be the big magazines, like Vogue, Marie Claire and Elle. Study the ads and articles, including the picture captions, to see what fabrics and colors are “in” this season. Look to the masters — Dior, Dolce & Gabbana and the like — to see what elements they use in their designs. Use those designs as inspiration to create your own fashionable looks more affordably.

As you develop your personal style, don't be afraid to throw out anything that doesn't fit your current look. Anthony Saffery/Getty Images

5: Assess Your Current Wardrobe

Get to know the contents of your closet. Looking through your wardrobe will help you identify your current style — what you like about it and what you wish you could change.

A walk through your closet will help you get a sense of what you feel most comfortable wearing — short skirts or long flowing dresses, business suits or track suits. Look at your clothing styles and colors, as well as your shoe and accessory collections.

Also use this opportunity to do some spring cleaning. Pull out each piece in your wardrobe and ask yourself:

  • Is it worn out, ripped or stained?
  • Is it more than three years old?
  • Is it out of style?
  • Does it fit?
  • Does it match anything else in your wardrobe?
  • Has it been hanging in your closet unworn for more than a season?

If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, put that item into a bag. When the bag is full, give it to charity and take the tax write-off, or sell it at a consignment store and make some extra cash that you can use to fill your wardrobe gaps.

4: Make a Few Changes

You don't need to reinvent your entire wardrobe to develop your personal style, but you do need to pick up a few new things. Tim Kitchen/Getty Images

You don’t need to reinvent your entire wardrobe. That would cost a fortune. Instead, update it. Start by introducing a few up-to-date pieces that reflect your style — some earrings, a new pair of shoes or a scarf.

Don’t be afraid to experiment a little, but take baby steps. If you’ve been very conservative your whole life, buy one “out there” piece. Shop in places you wouldn’t normally go, like an antique clothing store or (if you can afford it) a high-end designer boutique. You might find that you like taking a few risks with your wardrobe.

To save money, try updating what you already have. Do you have an old pair of jeans that’s starting to look ratty? Crop or roll them up into Capri pants or shorts. Have a pair of pants that no longer fits? Have them tailored to look like new. Re-invent an old boring dress with a new belt.

Although change is good, it’s also important to maintain a core wardrobe composed of a few well-designed and constructed pieces. Keep some classic staples in your closet that you can mix and match to give you more bang for your fashion buck. Head to the next page for some pointers.

The little black dress is a fashion staple that few women can go without. Inti St. Clair/Getty Images

3: Stock Up on Wardrobe Essentials

Now matter what your personal style, every spectacular wardrobe has to start with a few basic pieces. You can incorporate these classics into a variety of looks.

Here are the must-haves for every wardrobe:

Black pants. The quickest way to dress up any shirt is to put on a pair of black pants. Pick a versatile fabric that will take you through the seasons.

Black tank top. Wear it solo during the day, or throw a blazer over it to dress it up for nighttime.

Black turtleneck. Unless you live in Miami, you need this winter wardrobe staple in your closet. Just like the tank top, it can stand on its own or be used for layering.

White blouse. A plain white blouse never gets old, and you’ll never run out of ways to incorporate it into your wardrobe.

Jeans. Have a couple pairs of everyday blue jeans and a pair of black jeans for going out. Just make sure they fit you well, and don’t forget your skinny jeans — they’re real lifesavers on those “I feel fat” days.

Little black dress. This isn’t a cliché. Every woman looks great in her little black dress. It’s slimming, sexy and versatile.

Pencil skirt. Perfect for interviews or elegant dinners, this classic piece looks best hovering about two inches above the knee.

Trench coat. It looks stylish, and it will keep you dry and warm when the seasons change.

Cardigan sweater. Throw this over a tank top to transition an outfit from fall to winter.

Black high heels. Nothing shows off a great pair of legs better than a set of high heels. Black is the most versatile color. When you’re looking at heel height, go for both design and function. You can’t look good if you’re stumbling.

Once you have these essentials hanging in your closet, you can keep them updated with trendy jewelry, belts and shoes.

Rather walk around in flats than suffer in high heels? That's totally fine. Sean Gallup/Getty Images

2: Stay in Your Comfort Zone

Don’t suffer in stiletto heels when you’d rather wear flats. And don’t suck in your stomach to squeeze into a skin-tight pair of designer jeans. Wear what makes you comfortable.

If you’re not sure what makes you comfortable, look to your closet for inspiration. Sift through your clothes and pull out your favorites. Ask yourself why you love them. Do the fabrics feel good on your skin? Do you like the way the clothes make you look? Do you get a lot of compliments when you wear them? Use those favorite pieces as a springboard when you shop for new looks.

Speaking of shopping, don’t just rush in and out of stores — take time when you’re trying on clothes. Consider the ease of putting on the article of clothing, how good you look in it, and how well it fits in with your current wardrobe and needs.

Don’t go for the trendy; go for the comfortable. Wear what works for you. Paul Viant/Getty Images

1: Trust Your Instincts

No matter what the hottest designers, celebrities and stylists are saying on the pages of the fashion magazines, ultimately the only person you have to please is yourself. Buying an article of clothing that you hate just because it’s trendy is never a good idea. It’s going to hang idly in your closet until you finally decide to throw it out or give it away.

Similarly, don’t give in to pushy salespeople who are trying to convince you that they know what looks best on you. If don’t like what you see in the dressing room mirror, you won’t like that outfit any better once you get it home. Thank the salesperson for his or her time, and make your exit.

At the same time, if your instincts are telling you to put on the same ratty sweat suit you’ve been wearing for ten years, that’s the time to ignore them. Turn to the people you trust to help you weed out items in your wardrobe that didn’t showcase your best judgment.

For more fashion tips, take a look at the links on the next page.

Written By: Publish Site: tlc.howstuffworks.com/style/10-ways-to-develop-personal-style.htm

Trend Alert: Home Tapestry

Popular bloggers and designers share where they’re seeing home fabric trends going!

 

 

 

 

 

Alan Tanksley

“I am fascinated by 20th century tapestries, especially those with a story to tell. Many interpret classic themes from a modern, often abstract, point of view. Others reflect the social or cultural movements of their times. I love this example by the French tapestry artist Jean Picart le Doux, representing the Four Seasons.”

 

Jessica J. Packard of Oh I Design

“Tapestries add a sense of texture, pattern, and culture to any space. Lately, I’ve seen the most beautiful ones in the design district of Solana Beach, California.”

 

Maxwell Ryan, Apartment Therapy

“I consider myself contemporary and modern by most measures, but I love re-interpretation. I snapped this picture in Milan last spring, I was taken by Charlotte Lancelot’s new, big, textural take on grandma-inspired, cross-stitched tapestries. Not only is the tapestry beautifully rendered, the worn away patches are just as important. It’s the reference to age in lovely soft colors that I love.”

Annabel Ly, Blushing Ambition

“I found this floral tapestry messenger bag at a popular vintage store on Ebay—it’s the perfect unique option for carrying my laptop around.”

 

Grant K. Gibson

“I appreciate the sense of history in tapestry. When I found this pillow on 1stdibs.com, I loved how the fragment of 18th century Aubusson tapestry was cleverly repurposed for years to come.”

 

Michelle Fifis, Pattern Observer

“Tapestry-inspired prints, like the one used on this vintage dishcloth, are perfect for everyday use. I found this in my mother’s closet years ago and it’s still a favorite.”

 

Written By: Hannah Martin Publish Site: www.elledecor.com/design-decorate/trends/trend-alert-tapestry-decor-bloggers#slide-1

5 Fashion Trends for Spring 2013

So for those facing the change from winter to spring, it’s worth baring in mind which trends will remain in fashion for spring 2013.

1. Capes

The cape is such a perfect winter layering staple that it can be hard to imagine wearing one in spring. But capes can not only work, they can be a pleasant and unexpected surprise in the warmer months. Burberry Prorsum’s runway was the perfect example of that: capes in Duchess Satin in seasonal colours proved that the cape was here to stay, and more desirable than ever.

capes for all seasons
Salvatore Ferragamo F/W ’12, Burberry Prorsum S/S ’13

2. Oriental-inspired clothing

You known when Miuccia Prada jumps onto something, it’s here to stay… for a while at least. Prada’s Japanese-inspired runway of modern Geisha girls brought the oriental fashion fascination into the coming warmer months. And it wasn’t just Prada – the likes of Etro, Issa and Behnaz Sarafpour bought Asian influences of their own. So those kimonos and oriental-print silks you got for fall, are more than welcome to stick around.

asian inspired fashion
Dries Van Noten F/W ’12, Prada S/S ’13

3. Leather skirts

Leather is just for winter – said no-one ever who actually knew what they were talking about. Leather works across the seasons and those leather skirts we loved so much for the colder months aren’t precluded from working in spring and even summer. Lighter weight leathers and in lighter hues will of course be ideal, but don’t forget that you can always head out at night – once the sun has gone down – in your black pleated leather skirt even in spring.

leather skirts
Akris F/W ’12, Rag & Bone S/S ’13

4. Playful retro pieces

If you’ve found yourself indulging in some playfully retro pieces – like 1950s style costume jewellery, pencil skirts, vintage-style hats and anything that takes its cues from the bold, bright side of 1960s fashion, fear not: there’s no reason you can’t keep playing dress-ups with it. Spring brings ample opportunity to show off legs in micro-mini mod dresses, or to cinch waists and layer on the attitude like a retro bombshell babe.

playful retro
DSquared2 F/W ’12, Moschino S/S ’13

5. Metallics

The spring 2013 runways shone with metallic hues: bronze, gold, silver, leather, silk, lurex… If it was metallic, odds are you could spot it on some runway or another. You’ll also find that, come spring / summer 2013, metallics will be on many a shop shelf. Keeping any metallics you’ve invested in through 2012 is not only a good idea, it’s a must.

metallic to keep
Paco Rabanne F/W ’12, Emporio Armani S/S ’13

 

Written By: Tania Braukämper Publish Date: February 1, 2013 Publish Site: www.fashionising.com/trends/b–clothes-to-keep-across-seasons-37644.html